The Practice of Peer Observation.

By: Jacqueline M. DiSanto, Ed.D., Associate Professor, Education; Sandy Figueroa, M.S., Associate Professor, Business; Carlos Guevara, M.S., Director, Office of Educational Technology; Antonios Varelas, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Behavioral and Social Sciences; Diana Macri, M.S.Ed., R.D.H.,  Assistant Professor, Allied Health;
Andrea Fabrizio, Ph.D., Associate Professor, English; Sherese Mitchell, Ed.D., Associate Professor, Education; Sean Gerrity, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, English

Hostos Community College of the City University of New York (CUNY)

 

Abstract

     This paper discusses existing literature on peer observation. It also focuses on work done by an investigative, information-sharing committee at an urban community college in the South Bronx that was created to communicate best practices for conducting peer observations. The Peer Observation Improvement Network for Teaching (POINT) committee views peer observations as faculty-development opportunities that can lead to improved teaching. Using pre- and post-observation conversations to share pedagogy and resources, writing recommendations for growth, and conducting faculty observations in an online environment are examples of topics addressed by POINT.

Key words:  collegial conversations, faculty development, online learning, peer observation, professional growth.

 

Hostos Online Learning Assessment (HOLA) Follow-Up: Student Perceptions in Two Cohorts.

Authors:

Kate S. Wolfe, Ph.D.
Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences
Hostos Community College of the City University of New York (CUNY)

Dr. Jacqueline M. DiSanto
Department of Education
Hostos Community College of the City University of New York (CUNY)

Iber Poma
Educational Technology Department
Hostos Community College of the City University of New York (CUNY)

Wilfredo Rodríguez
Educational Technology Department
Hostos Community College of the City University of New York (CUNY)

Abstract

 

This article is a follow-up article to our 2016 publication in this journal. The authors examined data from two cohorts, Fall 2015 and Fall 2016, to assess the stability of our survey results and learn more about student perceptions of online learning at Hostos Community College, an urban Hispanic-serving community college.  Faculty have been working with the Office of Educational Technology (EdTech) as a task force to measure students’ perceptions of their online learning experiences since 2015.  The Hostos Online Learning Assessment (HOLA) Task Force designed a survey to identify strengths and weaknesses in online teaching and student preparedness for online learning.  Understanding these perceptions is crucial in order to build upon current best practices.  Despite limitations in our sample size, this follow up study found great consistency of student perceptions across both semesters. We continue to assess student perceptions annually at Hostos Community College in order to continually improve our online teaching and learning environment.

 

Hostos Online Learning Assessment (HOLA) Follow-Up: Student Perceptions in Two Cohorts.

 

Student perceptions of online learning are integral to building upon current best practices and also gauging the preparedness of the students for the online learning environment, particularly in an urban, Hispanic-serving community college (Wolfe et al., 2016). Hostos Community College (HCC) was founded 50 years ago as part of the City University of New York (CUNY), and is located in the South Bronx, the poorest congressional district in the country.  HCC enrolls approximately 7,200 students, and more than half (5,070) are enrolled full time.  Sixty-three percent of students reside in the Bronx, and many come from families who reside below the poverty line.  Almost 67 percent of students identify as female, and the vast majority of students (81 percent) are 29 years old or younger, with 47 percent 21 years of age or younger.  Students at Hostos are ethnically diverse.  Nearly 60 percent identify as Hispanic, 21 percent as Black, and 18 percent as Other/Unknown.  Three percent identify as Asian and less than two percent as White.  The majority of first-year students are enrolled in developmental or remedial courses (Hostos Community College, Office of the President  & Office of Institutional Research and Student Assessment, 2018).  Hostos is categorized under the Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSI) program authorized by Title V of the Higher Education Act of 1965 and has received grants as a Hispanic-serving institution under the Department’s Office of Postsecondary Education (Minority Institutions, n. d.).

Dr. Jacqueline M. DiSanto

Dr. Jacqueline M. DiSantoDr. Jacqueline M. DiSanto is an Associate Professor and Unit Coordinator (for Early-Childhood Education) in the Education Department at Hostos Community College of the City University of New York. She earned a B.S. and M.A. in Business Education (NYU), a professional diploma in Administration (Fordham), and an Ed.D. (St. John’s University) in Instructional Leadership. Her areas of publication includes: online education, learning styles, translanguaging, and faculty development. She is a founding member of the Peer Observation and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Committees, and a member of the Instructional Evaluation Committee and college-wide Senate. She is a co-investigator in a grant-funded consortium for Open Educational Resources; Dr. DiSanto is coordinating the efforts to convert the complete 60-credit A.A.S. in Early-Childhood Education from for-pay textbook reliance to providing all content without charge to students.

Contact info:
Jacqueline M. DiSanto, Ed.D.
Assistant Professor, Early-Childhood Education
Hostos Community College, CUNY
Email: jdisanto@hostos.cuny.edu

Hostos Online Learning Assessment: A Survey of Student Perceptions

 

By: Prof. Kate S. Wolfe Assistant Professor, Behavioral and Social Sciences,

Prof. Sarah L. Hoiland, Assistant Professor, Behavioral and Social Sciences,

Prof. Kate Lyons, Associate Professor, Library and Educational Technology,

Carlos Guevara, Director, Educational Technology and CTL,

Dr. Kris Burrell, Assistant Professor, Behavioral and Social Sciences,

Dr. Jacqueline M. DiSanto, Assistant Professor, Education,

Prof. Sandy Figueroa, Assistant Professor, Business,

Dr. Aaron Davis, Instructional Designer, Educational Technology,

Iber Poma, Coordinator of Student Services, Educational Technology,

Wilfredo Rodríguez, Coordinator, Educational Technology,

Prof. Linda Ridley, Lecturer, Business

Hostos Community College, CUNY, New York

 

Abstract

 

The Office of Education Technology (EdTech) at Hostos Community College and faculty members from various departments created the Hostos Online Learning Assessment (HOLA) Task Force to design a survey for gathering and assessing data about students’ perceptions of their online learning experiences.  The task force wanted to utilize the survey results to identify strengths and weaknesses in online instruction and student preparedness for the online learning environment.  Student perceptions of online learning are integral to building upon current best practices and also gauging the preparedness of the students for the online learning environment, particularly in an urban, Hispanic-serving community college.  The survey and results will be discussed within the broader context of best practices and online learning assessments as well as the way the HOLA Task Force is utilizing the data to make meaningful changes in the survey instrument, in addittion planning for continuous improvement in online learning.

 

Keywords: online learning, asynchronous, hybrid, blended, student, community college, urban, Hispanic, African American