Faculty Development Recommendations

Existing resources (HETS member institutions or others):
  • CUNY Academic Commons: collaborative social network: http://commons.gc.cuny.edu
  • Quality Matters http://qmprogram.org/
  • UTPA Faculty Development for Online Courses
  • Hostos Asynchronous Initiative: The Hostos Asynchronous Initiative (an annual incentive-based project, which began in Fall 2013 to encourage faculty to develop and teach asynchronous courses using Blackboard) is modeled on the successful Hybrid Initiative, a community-based structure that centers on mentoring.  Each development team comprises of a mentor and a mentee.  The initiative has two phases and is accomplished during an academic year, and it usually starts in the Fall semesters. In the first phase faculty work closely with their mentor and EdTech specialists to develop their asynchronous course, and also attend scheduled workshops.  Once the course is developed, it goes through a review process in order to get approved. The second phase is the teaching phase, where the faculty member offers the asynchronous course for the first time, and works closely with his/her mentor to make the appropriate adjustments as needed. The review process is conducted by the EdTech Leadership Council (ETLC), and uses established guidelines (based on national standards) to validate the readiness and minimum requirements for the course to be classified as asynchronous. Click here to download the Asynchronous Development Guidelines.
  • Hostos Hybrid Initiative: The Hostos Hybrid Initiative (an annual incentive-based project, which began in 2009 to encourage faculty to develop and teach hybrid courses using Blackboard) has evolved from a workshop-based structure to a community-based structure that centers on mentoring.  There are different types of hybrid development teams (course development and course sharing), each comprise of a mentor and mentee.  The initiative has two phases and is accomplished during an academic year, and it usually starts in the Fall semesters. In the first phase faculty work closely with their mentor and EdTech specialists to develop their hybrid course, and also attend scheduled workshops.  Once the course is developed, it goes through a review process in order to get approved. The second phase is the teaching phase, where the faculty member offers the hybrid course for the first time, and works closely with his/her mentor to make the appropriate adjustments as needed.The review process is conducted by the EdTech Leadership Council (ETLC), and uses established guidelines (based on national standards) to validate the readiness and minimum requirements for the course to be classified as hybrid Click here to download the Hybrid Development Guidelines.
  • Bronx Community College: http://www.bcc.cuny.edu/OnlineLearning/
  • Borough of Manhattan Community College: http://socrates.bmcc.cuny.edu/elearningcenter/BMCC%20E-Learning%20Course%20Checklist.pdf
Professional Development involves 10 online modules and two f-2-f meetings during course development where faculty show their work and give each other feedback; a follow-up meeting during implementation to discuss their teaching experience, problems, solutions, wins; and peer mentoring during 3rd semester.  Courses must go through a review process before they are scheduled.
  • https://mnwest.ims.mnscu.edu – within our D2L instance, we have a “Teaching with D2L” comprehensive “all things D2L” site.  Note that we don’t recreate what D2L already has in their user guides…this is above and beyond, tips, tricks, problem solving.
  • http://tinyurl.com/lvwsrd4 – This is the Kutztown University D2L support page, fully customized to KU’s instance of D2L. These are specifically task-oriented videos and pdfs that are all under 3 minutes in length.
http://kuconverge.web.kutztown.edu/ – this is the Kutztown University faculty support online journal. This is a peer-to-peer mentoring site that is administered and facilitated by the Office of Distance Education.